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Posts Tagged ‘Frances de la Tour’

Alan Bennett’s new play, “The Habit of Art” opened yesterday.

Seeing it, I was reminded of something that David Hare wrote about the reception of “Pravda”, the Fleet Street satire that he co-wrote with Howard Brenton. Before a single review had been written, before a single line had been spoken, the two authors, sitting in the audience, looked at each other in delighted disbelief because it was already apparent before the lights went down on the first night that the audience had decided to love the play. Every line was met with delight, every laugh was twice as loud, and twice as long as they had dreamed, and the ovations went on and on.

And so it was with “The Habit of Art” – a consideration of artistic identity told through an imagined encounter between Auden and Britten when both men were in their sixties.

What struck me was that Bennett had (according to the programme note, quite late in the day) framed the story as a “play within a play” – enabling any questions that had arisen in the rehearsal process of the original, unadorned play to be voiced (and answered) by the playwright, stage manager and other attendant crew who watched a “run-through” in the rehearsal room. I think it worked very well, enabling Bennett to add a consideration of the process of acting and theatre as another example of identity being accorded to those who create out of habit and determination, as well as love. Alex Jennings (as Britten – and the actor performing the role) gave a beautiful pair of performances; Frances de la Tour provided a magnificently tired, cynical, but loving portrait of a woman who had spent her life not just in the theatre, but in a role that subjugated her identity and desire to others – and Richard Griffiths (stepping in at late notice for Michael Gambon) gave a performance of tremendous charm, maybe not quite as unforgettable as his “Hector” in “The History Boys” – but tremendously affecting, funny and clear. Definitely one to see.

Seen within a month of David Hare’s “The Power of Yes” it was another striking example of a great playwright who had presented a play that used commentary, notes and glossing to tell his story and present his argument. And then, of course, there is the powerhouse performance of Fiona Shaw in Brecht’s “Mother Courage and Her Children” – the ultimate playwright glossing his own work with a commentary. All three plays are running at the National Theatre: all three are giving us a very clear view (though from three very different positions) of dramatists examining – ┬ápossibly even doubting – the traditional form of the play.

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